Mohel, NYC Mohel, NJ Mohel, Bris Ceremony, Baby Doctor, One Mohel, Dr. Dania Rumbak, Circumcision, Bris, Certified Mohel, Certified Bris, Bris Doctor, Mohel Doctor, NY Mohel, Mohel NY, Mohel NJ, Mohel NYC, Dr. Rumbak, Dania Rumbak, Mohel Doctor

© ONE MOHEL | All rights reserved

  • Facebook

Bris Ceremony

Traditional Outline

After the baby is welcomed,
the mohel performs the surgical cut

There is ample opportunity for customization of the Bris ceremony.  Dr. Rumbak is excellent at making each Bris ceremony unique, insightful, and truly special.  Blessings can be recited only in English (or both English and Hebrew), so everyone feels included.  Plus, Dr. Rumbak prepares a formal Bris program to be passed out to all attendees.

Circumcision

Naming

Baby's name is announced
publicly to everyone in the room

Blessings

Blessings are recited by: 
parents, grandparents, all present
 
 

Circumcision Ceremony

The ceremony commences with the baby being carried into the room by the "kvatter couple".  This couple can be G-d parents of the baby, or it can be a married couple with no kids with the blessing that they shall get pregnant.  The baby is placed on the Chair of Elijah to spiritually welcome Elijah the Prophet into the room.

The baby is then handed to the “Sandak”, which is the person who is responsible for holding the baby during the circumcision procedure.  This is the most honored position of the ceremony and is often given to a grandfather.

 

The parents recite a blessing acknowledging the mitzvah of circumcision and delegate this honor to Dr. Rumbak for performing the cut.  Dr. Rumbak then performs the circumcision on the baby boy.

After the cut, the parents recite a prayer that they have fulfilled the obligation to enter their son into the covenant of Abraham.  All present in the room then say a prayer for the baby that he shall be blessed to get married, to carry honest values, and to have a life full of good deeds.

 

Naming Ceremony

The parents start the naming ceremony by taking a wine cup with their right hand.  Wine is a symbol of Jewish unity and beginning.  A prayer is recited for the wine to mark the spiritual beginning of the baby's name.

Dr. Rumbak recites the formal naming prayer, where the baby's English Name and Hebrew Name is announced for the very first time.  In receiving a Hebrew name, the baby is welcomed into the community of the Jewish people.

After the name is announced, the baby is blessed with greatness.  The parents repeat a blessing after Dr. Rumbak expressing gratitude to G-d for this special day, and wishing the baby a speedy recovery on being entered into the covenant.  Both parents drink the wine.

 

Blessings

The mother recites a blessing called "Ha'Gomel", expressing gratitude to G-d for the miracle of childbirth.  This blessing also asks G-d to bless the mother with a complete postpartum recovery and to grant her strength of body and spirit to nurture the baby.  The blessing ends with appreciation to G-d for bestowing kindness upon the mother.

The father says a prayer thanking G-d for the blessing of parenthood and asking G-d for the privilege to walk his son to the wedding canopy when it shall be his day to get married.  Both parents together then bless the baby with a life of good health, wealth, and honor.  The prayer ends with asking G-d to rear him with love.

After the parental blessings, the baby receives special blessings from the community:  Grandparents, Aunts, Uncles, and all present.  Everyone together then recites the Priestly Blessing, which is the blessing the High Priests bestowed on the Jewish people after receiving the Ten Commandments at Mount Sinai. 

 

The parents share why they picked the name, and offer some words as to the name's personal meaning.  The baby is carried out of the room to song, as Dr. Rumbak leads the room in singing "Siman Tov U’Mazel Tov" which translates to:  "May good signs and fortune light your way."

 

The Celebratory Meal

Guests are invited to partake in the celebratory meal.  This is known as the "Seudat Mitzvah", which marks the culmination of the baby's ascent into the covenant between the Jewish people and G-d.

Both parents say a blessing for the bread ("Ha'Motzi"), with the bread dipped in honey to mark the extra sweetness of the day.  It is often customary for grandparents and other family members to share a few words during the meal.